Techie Tuesday: The Anchor

Often, when you think of kayaking, you don’t think about anchors. You want to move! But if you are using your kayak to fish, hunt, or take pictures, you want (need) to stay in one spot.

Lightweight-Fluke-Style-Anchor

Lightweight fluke style anchor, available at Folbot.com

There’s a great blog post on YakGear.com, “How to Park your Kayak,” that we think is a helpful read. Our favorite tip is their “Golden Rule of Anchors.”

One of the most common mistakes involving anchors is using too little anchor line when trying to set the anchor. For boats, the golden rule of anchor lines is 7:1. That means for every 1 foot of water you are in, you will need 7 feet of anchor line. For example, if the water is 10 feet deep, you would need 70 feet of anchor line. For kayaks, 7:1 may be a little extreme, but it’s always better to have out too much line, rather than too little. The idea behind the golden rule of anchoring is that you do not want the anchor line to be straight up and down in the water. If it is, the anchor will not fall on its side and will not catch the bottom effectively. Too little anchor line will result in dragging. With a longer anchor line, the angle of the anchor line to the bottom will be much less, allowing the anchor to dig in to the bottom much more effectively.

Keep in mind that as the water level changes with tides and currents, you may need to adjust your anchor. When in doubt, always use more anchor line than you think you will use.

Anchors aweigh!

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Techie Tuesday: Outriggers

We include outriggers and pontoons with our new Sporting Life model, Fish ‘n’ Photo package and Upwind Sailing Rig.  Outriggers are simply a solid extension of a boat’s rigging that extends beyond the gunwales.  Many people think of Hawaiian outrigger canoes with the outrigger on one side of the canoe.  Our outriggers are on both sides of your kayak.

Edisto Fish n Photo Front

Folbot Edisto with Outriggers and Pontoons

Our outriggers are 1 1/2 inch aluminum tubes that attach to the washboards with stainless steel “J” hooks. At the ends are banana shaped pontoons that are designed to add stability without pulling your kayak off its track and keep from being buried under the water (and even made to match the color of your Folbot!)

What these pontoons and outriggers do is spread the weight of the kayak and paddles over a larger surface.  When this happens the center of gravity of the kayak increases and it allows the paddler to be extremely stable even with sitting on top of the washboards or standing on the floorboard.  With this extra height, you have a larger field of vision and improved views into the water.  You can more comfortably use your fishing, hunting, or photography equipment.  In fact, it’s so stable you can even throw a casting net for bait fish or shrimp!

The Wind Up

The Wind Up

The Toss

The Toss